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Paid Teacher In Myanmar

Overall Rating

10/ 10

  • The School/Placement

    10

  • Living Situation

    10

  • Pay and Benefits

    10

  • Teacher Support

    10

  • Health and Safety

    10

  • Social Life

    10

Come to Myanmar

My experience , like my colleague Chris’s has been incredible. I originally came to SE Asia with Geo-Visions on the teach Thailand program back in December 2012, after teaching in the North of Thailand for about 4 months I had the opportunity to work directly for Xplore Asia, I was teaching the TESOL and developing additional programs aimed at supporting the range or candidates that come over to Thailand. I was then given the opportunity to support the development of the new affiliate company of Xplore-Asia and Geo-Visions called NELC-Xplore. 

For the past 10 -12 months I have been teaching TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) to local Myanmar teachers as well as the few Westerners that have ventured this way. It's been a really rewarding experience. I have also been developing additional programs and further opportunties for Westerners who want to come to Myanmar. 

As my colleague has already stated the highlight of our week is volunteering our time every Sunday morning, at a local orphanage. The orphanage is home to many ethnic minorities that have been displaced over the past several years due to conflict, natural disasters and family health issues. I have the privilege of teaching the teachers, enabling them to practice their spoken English and support their development of how to improve how they teach English to the children. At times we even have some of the local Monks sitting in the class. They really are thankful and appreciate of the time we take to spend with them.

 When possible we try and arrange for the TESOL students to complete their teaching practice at this and another orphanage – as they have no native English teachers and the children and TESOL students both benefit form the experience.
I cannot agree more with my colleagues statement:
Yangon is an interesting city. At times it can be extremely chaotic, between the constant traffic and beeping of horns, to the air pollution. Underneath all of the hustle and bustle lies a city that whose people just may be the kindest and friendliest in the world. You do get stared at because you are a foreigner (and they still don't see a lot in the country), but more often than not a stare that is returned with a smile usually yields a smile back. Myanmar people are extremely engaging and welcoming. 

The experience here is certainly different from Thailand, but it many ways it is more rewarding. Myanmar transitioned to democracy in 2011 and since then has been opening it's doors to the rest of the world. When you are here you feel as if you are a part of this transition, and perhaps in some way helping.
It's not an easy place to live at times, and can be quite frustrating but, the overall generosity of the people, their warmness, is second to none. There was a minor fire in the street where I live a couple of weeks ago, shutting of the electricity – not only did our Myanmar colleagues get in touch with me to ensure I was safe, my local taxi driver did as well. Tell me, where else would that happen??????
What keeps me here, like Chris is the great work that we are involved in, the constant changes and challenges, that each day brings and the new people we meet. It’s also the fact that you feel like you are making a difference, even if its only a small one. 

I certainly have had a positive experience with both Geo-Visions in their support in placing me in Thailand and Xplore-Asia when I was teaching and would definitely recommend their services.

Overall Rating

10/ 10

  • The School/Placement

    10

  • Living Situation

    10

  • Pay and Benefits

    10

  • Teacher Support

    10

  • Health and Safety

    10

  • Social Life

    10

Incredible Country and People

My experience in Myanmar to date has been incredible. I originally came to SE Asia with GeoVisions on the teach Thailand program back in April 2013, after teaching in the south of Thailand for about 6 months I decided that I wanted a change of pace and came to work for an affiliate of XploreAsia and GeoVisions called NELC-Xplore.

For the past 7 months I have been teaching TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) to local Myanmar teachers and it's been a really rewarding experience. The teachers are extremely engaged in learning new methods of teaching English and make teaching the class a lot of fun. They want to be the best teachers that they can be for their students and being apart of that is very fulfilling from a personal and professional standpoint.

We also spend some time every Sunday volunteering as a company at a local orphanage. The orphanage is home to many ethnic minorities that have been displaced over the past several years due to conflict, natural disasters and family health issues. We teach the teachers at the school advanced English, while running some fun English lessons for the kids that involve a lot of games and activities. They are so thankful and really appreciate the time you take to spend with them.

Yangon is an interesting city. At times it can be extremely chaotic, between the constant traffic and beeping of horns, to the air pollution. Underneath all of the hustle and bustle lies a city that whose people just may be the kindest and friendliest in the world. You do get stared at because you are a foreigner (and they still don't see a lot in the country), but more often than not a stare that is returned with a smile usually yields a smile back. Myanmar people are extremely engaging and often times when I sit at tea shops, I have people coming up to me asking me where I come from and what I'm doing in the country.

The experience here is certainly different from Thailand, but it many ways it is more rewarding. Myanmar transitioned to democracy in 2011 and since then has been opening it's doors to the rest of the world. When you are here you feel as if you are a part of this transition, and perhaps in some way helping. I'll be honest, it's not an easy place to live and sometimes I wish I was back in Thailand because the city of Yangon is intense. What keeps me here is the great work that we are doing and the fact that you feel like it certainly is an adventure.

I had a positive experience with both GeoVisions and XploreAsia and would definitely recommend their services.

Overall Rating

10/ 10

  • The School/Placement

    10

  • Living Situation

    9

  • Pay and Benefits

    10

  • Teacher Support

    10

  • Health and Safety

    10

  • Social Life

    10

Teaching Here Is Really Great

Things are really great. Teaching in Myanmar is a lot different than Thailand. Since the orientation is in Thailand, you have to brace yourself for another culture shock when you get here. The standard of living is very, very low...its a very dirty city in Yangon, and its kind of an over-sized shantytown in a lot of places. Not everywhere, but you can't ignore something that is such a prominent aspect of a city. The people are great, very excited to see foreigners mostly...some stare, but when you smile 99% will smile back at you. I think there's still a lot of uncertainty regarding westerners...make sure you do lots of research on the last 60 years of political issues that have been happening. Just so you have a backdrop for why its like it is here. The economy is tanked, and there is no governmental investment in things that we expect.....maintenance of roads, educational standards, job creations...etc.

There's a very different mentality required to be here for more than a couple months, I think . Thailand is geared towards tourists, and still feels like vacation after a few months. Here in Myanmar, westerners aren't out everywhere, and even though there are quite a few of them, there are a lot of things that make independence a bit more difficult than in Thailand.

None of these things are complaints! This program is really good.

The Visa run was super easy; Americans can just do a visa on arrival at the airport, but they have to pay $50 in crisp American currency; if its old or beat up they don't take it.

My students are great. Its been a bit of an awkward couple of weeks, finding my rhythm. Students here have a head start over the Thai students, and while that seems like it might make things easier, I actually found it more difficult to gauge their ability levels.

Starting from scratch, you at least know that you have to teach EVERYTHING. Here, they have a good foundation, so you have to up the ante a bit to keep it interesting.

MissBurmese on Youtube was very helpful in learning some basic phrases for me; I would encourage people to look up and familiarize themselves with food and numbers before they get here, because that helps navigate the multitude of street vendors, pricing, and taking a bus. Taxis are everywhere, but I like being able to just go off and explore, and a bus is 20 cents US versus $2 one way.

Overall Rating

9/ 10

  • The School/Placement

    7

  • Living Situation

    8

  • Pay and Benefits

    7

  • Teacher Support

    7

  • Health and Safety

    8

  • Social Life

    10

a country on the cusp

This country is unlike anywhere else in SE Asia. It is the crossroads of Indian and Chinese cultures, welcoming to all. Ancient Bagan and royal Mandalay are only the well-known diamonds, but thr mine is deep and the storehouse rich (especially with jade!). Myanmar is uncommonly safe. The people go out of their ways to notice you, welcome you and make you feel at home. I have already been "adopted" by a family, my neighbors, and my new, second mother cooks and prepares me a lunch box for work everyday. The other foreigner teachers are close knit, and there is always something to do and see. Yangon is a blooming city on the rise towards international powerhouse. Keep your eyes out for this country becoming a leader over the next decade! Ancient and modern, spiritual and lively, you won't find another experience like this.

Overall Rating

8/ 10

  • Social Life

    7

  • Health and Safety

    7

  • Teacher Support

    5

  • Pay and Benefits

    4

  • Living Situation

    5

  • The School/Placement

    8

Teaching English in Myanmar

I've been teaching English in Myanmar for two months now, and so far it has been a great experience. I feel like I lucked out with my school- aircon, computers, internet access (most days), a printer (most days), and even a free shuttle to and from my neighborhood. The staff have been warm and welcoming. My apartment is great, however renting through XploreAsia is a bit expensive compared to what you can rent on your own. The XploreAsia staff has been really helpful in taking care of my questions and needs. If you have school loans and bills to pay off at home, the income in Myanmar is just enough to get by (depending on the amount of bills you need to pay back home), so keep that in mind if you are hoping to be able to take care of these expenses while working abroad! In Myanmar, foreigners are charged more than locals for just about everything. We do earn more, but with bills back home, it can get tight. Otherwise, you will earn enough to live comfortably in Myanmar.