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Teach Film & Media in Honduras | No Fees | 100% Fully Funded

Overall Rating

10/ 10

  • Social Life

    10

  • Health and Safety

    10

  • Community Impact

    10

  • Living Situation

    10

  • Program Administration

    10

  • Volunteer Experience

    10

Teaching filmmaking in Honduras

When I first learnt about the FWB initiative, I was immediately drawn to it by the awesome opportunity it would give me to explore a different culture while doing what I love. The fact that there were other people across other countries doing the same was just as exciting as it sounds! Not only I had the hands-on cultural exchange from my direct experience, but I was also learning from what was going on in the other places.

FWB provided me with an outstanding curriculum with concise lesson plans, examples and activities, as well as lots extra reading materials. This made the teaching flow easily and smoothly, allowing me to struggle less with class mechanics and focus more on the kids and in getting them to engage with each other and with the filmmaking process.

The coolest thing is the cultural exchange you get when it comes the time to run the Connected Classrooms project: you and your students basically create a film with students from another country via online collaboration. If this sounds amazing is just because it really is!

As an FWB fellow, I was also constantly being encouraged to take my creative work to higher levels. Through an intensive and rewarding flow of materials like photos and videos, I was able to unleash my imagination and systematically explore the new reality that surrounded me. The progressive logic built in the programme, and the constant feedback I received from the NYC staff allowed me to finetune some of my skills and learn new ways to deal with increasingly challenging tasks. Also, the equipment package provided by FWB basically covers all your needs as a filmmaker (I personally didn't bring any equipment with me and did just fine).

When it came the time to leave Honduras, my general feeling was that I had really impacted not only the kids, but also the whole community. I had become a well-known figure, and I knew I mattered to those people as much as they mattered to me. In the end, leaving was hard, but also rewarding, because I could see the footprint I had left behind. And it was beautiful.